Miami Walking Tour

DOWNTOWN MIAMI WALKING TOUR

MIAMI

ACCESS

HISTORY

DOWNTOWN MIAMI WALKING TOUR

MIAMI RIVER

LUMMUS PARK

WAGNER HOMESTEAD

“The oldest known house standing in Miami today dates from the mid- 1850s. It was built by William Wagner, a discharged Mexican War veteran who followed his former army troop to South Florida at the end of the Seminole Wars…William Wagner remained in Miami until his death in 1901.” Margaret Ammidown, “The Wagner Family: Pioneer Life on the Miami River” http://digitalcollections.fiu.edu/tequesta/files/1982/82_1_01.pdf

FORT DALLAS

“This native oolitic limestone building was constructed around 1844 as slave quarters on William English’s plantation located near the mouth of the Miami River. The building served as a U .S. Army barracks after Fort Dallas was reestablished here in 1849 and 1855 during the Second and Third Seminole Wars. Moved to Lummus Park in 1925, Fort Dallas is one of only two surviving buildings from Miami’s pioneer era, the other being the William Wagner House, also located in Lummus Park.” (http://www.historicpreservationmiami.com/ftdallas.html)

MIAMI’S KILOMETER ZERO

FORT DALLAS PARK

BRICKELL MASOLEUM

MIAMI CIRCLE

From the National Park Service

The site contains early and late components of the primary village of the Tequesta people, who were one of the first Native North American groups encountered by Juan Ponce de Leon in 1513 (Davis 1935). Considerable research has been conducted at the site since the discovery of intact deposits and features in 1998. The site’s significance lies in well-preserved evidence of American Indian architecture, considerable materials related to patterns of regional and long-distance exchange, elements of ceremonialism involving animal interments, and association with the Tequesta people, who are significant because of their cultural persistence following European Contact and their association with the unique environment of the Everglades.

The Miami Circle was discovered during archeological salvage excavations at the Brickell Point site (8DA12) in 1998 (Carr and Ricisak 2000). The Miami Circle is comprised of holes and basins carved into the shallow Miami Oolite limestone formation. Stratified accretionary midden deposits occur over and in the holes that make up the Circle. The midden is comprised of organically stained soil, dense deposits of faunal bone, and occasional lenses of marine bivalve shells. Artifacts found during excavations are typical of the Glades Area, including sand-tempered ceramics and some early decorated Glades series sherds, as well as bone and shell implements. Exotic items, like basaltic stone Celts, galena, pumice, and chipped stone artifacts, also have been recovered.

GESU CHURCH

FEDERAL BUILDING

BERLIN WALL

FREEDOM TOWER


EDITORS AND LAST UPDATE
Stephanie Sepúlveda & John William Bailly  30 September 2020
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