Deering Ecosystems

EIGHT ECOSYSTEMS AT THE DEERING ESTATE
The flora and fauna of the Deering Estate enable visitors to experience Miami as it was before the major development of the region in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Deering Estate has eight distinct ecosystems. Within those ecosystems are 89 threatened, endangered, or commercially exploited plant species. Listed below are the eight ecosystems.

BEACH DUNE

FLOW-WAY

MANGROVES

“A mangrove wetland can be one of the most productive ecosystems in world. Mangrove communities along the coastal areas of Biscayne Bay stabilize bottom sediments and protect shorelines from erosion and storm surge. Forest and fringe communities provide protection from storm surge and can potentially reduce damage to upland areas from hurricanes. Mangrove trees provide nesting and roosting habitat for many resident and migrating birds in addition to providing shelter and a safe nursery to growing marine life. Mangrove leaves are also a large component of the near shore food web.” miamidade.gov

PINE ROCKLAND

REMNANT SLOUGH

SALT MARSH

“Salt marshes are extensive intertidal areas that can be found in temperate areas such as northern Florida’s Gulf and Atlantic coasts. This ecosystem is dominated by grasses and herbaceous plants, which provide the coastline with protection from direct wave action. The dominant species are smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) and blackrush (Juncus roemerianus). Both of these species are found in South Florida, but reside in a coastal community known as the mangrove swamp.” miamidade.gov

SUBMERGED SEA GRASS

TROPICAL HARDWOOD HAMMOCK


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EDITORS AND LAST UPDATE
Stephanie Sepúlveda & John William Bailly  09 March 2021
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