Miami In Miami: Daniel A. Perez

Hey, my name is Daniel Perez, I’m 19 years old and I am currently a sophomore at FIU. I am majoring in Mechanical Engineering with hopes to continue onto the field of law as an IP attorney.

I am a Miamian born and raised. First generation born in the United States from a Cuban background. I was brought up in the land of sexy people, summer fun year round, and everyone owning a Ferrari or something like that. So of course I wanted to see even more of my home.

I decided to take this course because I’m a bit curious and adventurous. I love learning the ins and outs of things and what better thing to learn about than your own home. I’m hoping to learn about things I didn’t even think you could find here in Miami, and I’m looking forward to the adventures we’ll go on together.

Metro In Miami

The first off-campus meeting for the Miami in Miami class began with us gathering at the Dadeland South Metro Station. Here the class would be one of the few in Miami to purchase a day pass to be able to get around the city via the metro. Public transportation is definitely not the most popular means of transport for Miamians.

Professor Bailly pointed out an interesting observation at our first stop. He talked about the size of the sidewalk, and how here in Miami the sidewalks are generally smaller when compared to those of other major cities and other countries. Considering I have had the chance to travel and visit areas with more emphasis on public transportation, this simple and seemingly minuscule detail about our standards here in Miami surprised me. I had not taken the time to notice the size of our sidewalks because of that reason. We simply don’t walk to our destinations on a regular basis. Miami isn’t focused on its public transportation, and the areas that it does are fairly closed off to people like me that live in the Kendall area. It took me about an hour to reach the station by car, which was the closest stop to my home. The thought of using public transportation instead of a personal vehicle is not a bad idea at all, as a student it would make things easier honestly. I would have one less expense to worry about and there are the ecological benefits to think about. Less cars on the road means less emissions which generally mean a greener lifestyle by having a smaller carbon footprint. I feel like Miami could focus on that instead of its expansion on highway

Walk In Miami / Viscaya

9/29/19

On this meeting with the Miami in Miami class our trip around downtown was sidetracked by a small gem found by the professor in the form of Fort Dallas. A military base formed at the mouth of the Miami river to safeguard during times of war against Native Americans. The Fort has its own share of history. Much like Miami it was a place of change and became what it needed to be throughout the years. The small building began as a soldier’s barracks and then became a slave’s quarters. It then went on to become a military barrack once again during the war against Native Americans, followed by a courthouse and then as a meeting place for the Daughters of the Revolution.  

We continued the day by going to Viscaya. This time we had the chance to go through the individual rooms of the villa. To say the least Deering was a very intricate man. He didn’t care about certain social constraints. He cut a painting of the Saint Mary in half to be able to hide the pipes of an organ. He held a mosaic of Islamic art depicting Spaniard noble arms and placed a miniature replica of the Boy with Thorn and placed it next to a landline. Was there a significant purpose to it? Aesthetic most likely considering the type of man he was. Deering truly wanted to paint himself in an eccentric light, he wanted to be at the top, to seem like he was extremely cultured with a lineage. He was able to own the latest in technological advancements from refrigerators to vacuums to telephones. Deering displayed his need to be perceived as cultured from old European Deering portraits depicting people with no relation to him or his family, as well as the cut-out book spines that he held in his library. He painted that illusion in a very believable way, it took the form of his estate, and it is one of grandeur and extravagance the likes of which were very rare in Miami at the time.

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